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Written by: Diana Dascalu-Joffe, Senior Attorney, Public Lands, Center for Biological Diversity

My family is a busy, bustling and active bunch made up of two working parents, two very energetic and fun-loving kids, ages 10 and seven, and a sweet three-year-old chocolate lab named Violet. Our lives are pretty typical of most Denver metro-area families, running the kids around to activities and sports after school while maintaining meaningful careers in the field of environmental and energy law. There is never a dull moment and usually not much time to devote to reducing waste in our own home. We already own a highly energy efficient home with solar panels for heating and cooling. We drive only one car for our family of four, with my husband and I utilizing RTD public transportation to get to work. So, we already prioritize eco-friendly personal choices in our home and family. Our kids understand and value the part we all play in bettering life on this planet. It is one of our central core values as a family.

Since starting as senior public lands attorney with the Center for Biological Diversity in 2016, a tenant of The Alliance Center, I began to educate myself about my family’s personal waste stream and how we can begin to minimize trash beyond just recycling at home. The Alliance Center has a hard to recycle station in the building with information on what items can and cannot be recycled and what is actually landfilled. I learned a great deal from this station and the informational emails that would go out to tenants at The Alliance Center on how to use the station. The Alliance Center also composts food waste.

Back in 2016, our family would generate about two bags of trash for the landfill every week, even while doing our best to maximize our municipal recycling. We committed to cutting that landfill waste in half by utilizing The Alliance Center’s hard to recycle station for items that couldn’t be recycled by our municipal recycling program. Then, in 2017 we signed up for Denver’s municipal composting program. By 2018, our family reduced our landfill trash to one full trash bag a month, beating our goal by 175 percent.  We realized that most of our municipal trash was comprised of food waste and non-recyclable plastic bags, bathroom and cleaner waste, and foil-lined bags/tubes, which The Alliance Center takes to recycle. I bring a small bag full of these items to the Alliance Center every week, and it has made a big difference in our total family’s waste stream. My kids and husband have learned which items go into which bin (or recycle bag for mom’s office). We introduced this commitment to reducing waste into the core of our daily family routine. It is not only good for the planet, but good for our own well-being. Self-care, care of others and planet-care go hand in hand. While our family might not be totally zero waste in the foreseeable future, we have made it a priority to be as low-waste as possible.  The Alliance Center has given us the opportunity to do just that.