A person stands in the middle of a protest wearing a mask and holding a cardboard sign that says "Queers for climate justice" in all caps.

Happy Pride Month, Alliance community! Pride Month takes place each June to commemorate the 1969 Stonewall Uprising, a milestone for the queer liberation movement. It offers us a chance to honor LGBTQ+ folks who are no longer with us and to celebrate the love, joy, diversity and affirmation of queer and trans communities.

Here at The Alliance Center, we envision a future that is sustainable, equitable and provides all communities the opportunity to thrive. To accomplish this, our work must be intersectional, recognizing how our various identities influence our interactions with the world and how systems of oppression affect each of us in differing ways. Indeed, the environmentalist movement and the queer liberation movement are irrevocably connected—many of the same unjust power dynamics that perpetuate inequality and intolerance against queer and trans people also perpetuate unsustainable practices that are harmful to our environments, our communities and our futures. 

For this year’s Pride Month, we’ve assembled a list of some of the changemakers that are working at the intersection of queer liberation and environmentalism. We hope you’ll take some time—throughout the rest of June and beyond—to reflect on your own identity and how your unique voice might contribute to the environmentalist movement, the queer liberation movement and their intersection.

A person in a floral button-up shirt with a green hat on, holding a flower next to their face with other flowers in the background.

Vanessa Raditz is an environmental health researcher and youth educator dedicated to community healing, land and resource accessibility and the creation of thriving local economies based on human and ecological resilience. They are part of the founding collective of the Queer Ecojustice Project, which hosts events and workshops about queer ecojustice theory and strategy and offers a curated selection of multimedia resources for self-organized learning nodes. Raditz is working on a grassroots film project, Fire and Flood: Queer Resilience in the Era of Climate Change, rooted in their lived experience of the 2017 fires in Northern California. They also co-organized the Queers4ClimateJustice contingent to the RISE March for Climate, Jobs, and Justice in fall of 2018 and continue to manage the #Queers4ClimateJustice instagram.

A woman wearing ski goggles and a ski jacket stands on a snowy mountain.

Lindi von Mutius is an attorney, an educator, the Director of Board Operations and Strategy at The Trust for Public Land and a Board member for OUT for Sustainability, a platform for co-creating climate resilience and environmental justice by and for LGBTQ+ communities. Her work centers on bringing diversity to the environmental movement and highlighting the necessity of representation in outdoor spaces. In her article “The Look We Give”, von Mutius writes: “There’s a human need to find people like you doing the things you love; a yearning not just for acceptance, but for owning a shared experience. A biracial, bisexual, immigrant is still an oddity in the outdoor space. I once dated someone (for far too long) just because he was the only black man kayaking on Match.com. My bisexual pride flag is pinned to the outside of my backpacking pack, so that other queer folks know I’m there. I feel that this land—taken and colonized by white men; but shaped by the work of slaves, immigrants and people who look like me—is there for me to enjoy and protect.”

A person with dark hair, blue and pink highlights and a septum piercing sitting next to a dog with plants in the background.

Pinar Sinopoulos-Lloyd is a queer indigenous activitist and co-founder of Queer Nature, a nature education and ancestral skills program serving the LGBTQ2+ community. Although it is now permanently based out of Washington state, Queer Nature originally began in Colorado, right here in the Front Range! Along with their partner and co-founder, Sinopoulos-Lloyd works to increase cultural access to outdoor pursuits, especially survival skills like bushcraft, tactical skills and ethical hunting. They are dedicated to building interspecies alliances and an enduring sense of belonging for marginalized communities while maintaining awareness of impact and good land stewardship practices. 

A drag queen with long red hair wearing backpacking clothes stands in a forest holding a cardboard sign above her head that says "Mother nature is a lesbian" in all caps.

Wyn Wiley, also known as his backpacking drag queen alter ego Pattie Gonia, uses humor and entertainment to raise awareness about climate change and to bring attention to intersectional environmentalism. With her high heels, sustainably sourced outfits and heartfelt captions, Pattie Gonia works to make outdoor spaces safer and more accessible to marginalized communities. “Intersectional environmentalism lets us weave in our humanity, our culture, our queerness and our color into environmental work. We tell ourselves that all these issues are separate, but I think the magic happens when you intersect one thing with another. If you look at any space where people are making change, you will find queer people, you will find people of color, you will find indigenous people—and you’ll find women,” explains Wyn.

Once again, happy Pride Month, Alliance community! We love, appreciate and stand in solidarity with our LGBTQ+ colleagues and friends.